The At Home COVID-19 Saliva Collection Test Kit

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Quickly and efficiently order your at home rapid COVID-19 saliva collection test kit and view your test results in our secure, HIPAA compliant online portal.

  • Saliva Collection
    Saliva Collection - No Swabs Involved
  • Online Results
    Online Results - Secure HIPAA compliant online portal
$99.95 +$8.00 Physician Fee
Start COVID-19 Assessment

* Check My Test offers this test and collection kit with an FDA Emergency Use Authorization. This means that while the laboratory performing this test has validation data to support offering this test and the collection kit, neither have been approved or cleared by the FDA. This test has only been authorized by FDA for detection of nucleic acid from SARS-CoV-2 (i.e., the COVID-19 virus), and not for any other virus or pathogen. It is only authorized during the duration of the COVID-19 emergency declaration by federal regulators. Check My Test may modify or cease to offer the test and the test kit upon direction of state or federal regulators in its sole discretion.

Introducing the at home COVID-19 Saliva Test Kit

COVID-19 Symptoms

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

Guided Provider Consultation

How to take and use the test kit

Order our at home COVID-19 saliva collection test kit with total confidence.

  • Avoid contact from waiting rooms or long lines
  • Chat with a medical professional to guide you
  • Take the test in the comfort of your own home
  • See your test results securely & quickly online
  • Use your QR Code for business & safe travel
Start COVID-19 Assessment

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Below are answers to the most commonly asked questions.

If you feel like you are having a medical emergency, please call 9-1-1. If you are experiencing severe trouble breathing, continuous pain or pressure in your chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, blue-colored lips or face, or any other emergency signs or symptoms, please seek immediate medical care.

Common FAQs

What is PWNHealth?

PWNHealth is an independent healthcare provider network that provides oversight services to you in connection with the laboratory testing that you have requested. PWNHealth and its services are independent from the laboratory and company from whom you requested and registered for the test and their services.

What is a COVID-19 PCR test?

PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests check for genetic material (viral RNA) produced by the virus. This determines if an individual is actively infected with COVID-19 and can spread it to others.

Who should get a COVID-19 PCR test?

You should get tested if:

  • You have ​symptoms of COVID-19​ (such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath)
  • You don’t have symptoms but may have been exposed to COVID-19
  • You don’t have symptoms and haven’t been recently exposed but live or work in a place where people reside, meet, or gather in close proximity (this can include healthcare settings, homeless shelters, assisted living facilities, group homes, prisons, detention centers, schools, and workplaces).
  • Your employer, public health department, contact investigator, or healthcare provider has identified you as someone who should get tested.

If you believe you have symptoms of COVID-19 or that you have been exposed to the virus, you should consult your place of work for specific guidance about whether to stay home or continue working.

Visit the CDC website for more information about testing.

Who should not get a COVID-19 PCR test?

You should not get tested if you:

  • Currently have severe symptoms that limit your daily activities. Seek medical attention right away if this is the case.
  • Tested positive for COVID-19 in the last 3 months. Speak with your healthcare provider prior to getting tested.

What will my COVID-19 PCR test results tell me?

Your test results will confirm whether or not you are currently infected with COVID-19. If your results are positive, it is important to isolate immediately and continue to monitor your symptoms. If your results are negative, it means the virus was not present in the sample you provided.

After receiving your results, you will have an opportunity to speak with a licensed healthcare provider who can answer any questions you may have about your test results and help determine next steps in care.

Are there any limitations to COVID-19 PCR tests?

A PCR test may not detect the virus in early stages of infection. In addition, a PCR test may not detect the virus if there was a problem with your sample, such as when the sample is not collected as directed. There is also the possibility of a false negative (a negative result that is incorrect) if you’ve had recent exposure to the virus along with symptoms consistent withCOVID-19.

How is a COVID-19 PCR test performed?

This test is conducted either by nasal swab or saliva collection. The nasal swab test requires insertion of a swab into your nose and the back of your throat. The saliva test requires providing a sample of your spit into a collection tube.

How do I prepare for the test?

You do not need to do anything to prepare for the test. You do not need to fast or stop taking any medications before testing. Further instructions will be provided to you at the lab or in your test kit.

Where can I get more information?

If I have been vaccinated, do I still need to quarantine after being exposed to COVID-19?

You do not need to quarantine after being exposed to someone with COVID-19 if you:

  • Are fully vaccinated and it has been at least two weeks since your last dose AND
  • Are within three months following your last dose AND
  • Have not experienced symptoms since exposure

However, you should still monitor for symptoms for up to 14 days after your exposure.

If you do not meet all three of the criteria above, you should continue to follow quarantine guidance.

View All General COVID-19 FAQs

What is coronavirus disease (COVID-19)?

Coronavirus disease (also called COVID-19) is an infection caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus), one of the most recently discovered types of coronaviruses. Those who have this disease may or may not experience symptoms, which range from mild to severe.

How does COVID-19 spread?

COVID-19 spreads easily from person-to-person, even when an infected person is not showing symptoms. When an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, droplets containing the virus go into the air. These droplets can be inhaled or land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby, exposing them to the virus. These droplets may stay in the air for minutes to hours after an infected person has left that space and can infect others who are more than 6 feet away. This type of spread is called “airborne transmission”.

People may also be exposed to COVID-19 by touching their eyes, nose, or mouth after touching a surface with the virus on it. Although this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, researchers are still learning more about COVID-19.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after being exposed to the virus. The most common symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Cases of COVID-19 range from mild to severe. Some people who are infected don’t have any symptoms and don’t feel sick. Most people have mild symptoms. Visit the CDC website for more information about symptoms.

How long do COVID-19 symptoms last?

Most people recover from COVID-19 within two weeks, but some people continue to experience symptoms for weeks or even months after infection. In cases where symptoms persist, it is not clear how long they may last. Researchers are still learning more about the course of the disease. For more information, visit the CDC website.

What are the long-term effects of COVID-19?

The most commonly reported long-term symptoms include but are not limited to fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, joint pain, and chest pain. Other symptoms include difficulty focusing, depression, muscle pain, headache, occasional fevers, and fast-beating or pounding heart. At this time, researchers are still learning more about the long-term effects of the disease.

Who is at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19?

Severe cases are more likely to occur in the following people:

  • Older adults (the older you are, the higher your risk for severe illness from COVID-19).
  • People of any age with underlying medical conditions.

It is important to note that serious illness can also occur in young, healthy adults. If you have questions about your risk, talk to your healthcare provider. For more information, you can also visit the CDC website.

Am I at risk of getting COVID-19?

COVID-19 is very contagious. The risk of getting COVID-19 depends on many factors, including close contact with people who have symptoms of COVID-19. It is important to follow your federal, state, and local government guidance to protect yourself from exposure.

How is COVID-19 treated?

Not all people with COVID-19 will require medical attention or treatment, and most recover within two weeks.

For mild cases, treatment focuses on managing symptoms. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized bamlanivimab, as well as casirivimab and imdevimab. These are antibody therapies for use in people who are at high risk for being hospitalized or developing severe illness. For more information, visit the FDA website. If you’re experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms, be sure to follow up with your healthcare provider about your treatment options.

How can I protect myself from getting COVID-19?

The best way to protect yourself is to avoid situations in which you may be exposed to the virus. Everyday actions can help protect you and prevent the spread of respiratory diseases such as COVID-19.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Restrict any activities outside your home and maintain a safe distance (around 6 feet) between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This includes avoiding crowded areas, shopping malls, religious gatherings, public transportation, etc.
  • Wear simple cloth face coverings in public settings (like grocery stores and pharmacies) where social distancing is difficult, especially in areas where COVID-19 is spreading.
  • Stay home when you are sick, unless you are seeking medical care.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces (including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks).
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water aren’t available. Always wash hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

How can I prevent spreading COVID-19?

If you believe you may have COVID-19 or test positive for COVID-19 and have mild symptoms, the following steps can help prevent the disease from spreading to others:

  • Stay home except to get medical care
    • Take care of yourself by getting rest and staying hydrated
    • Over-the-counter medications, such as acetaminophen, may help you feel better
    • Avoid public areas, including work and school
    • Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis
    • Stay in touch with your healthcare provider
  • Separate yourself from other people
    • Stay in a separate room and away from other people and pets in your home
    • If possible, use a separate bathroom
    • If you need to be around other people or animals, wear a face covering
  • Cover your nose and mouth
    • If you are sick, wear a face covering when you are around other people or pets
    • Use a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw away used tissues in a lined trash can
  • Clean your hands often
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after being in a public place, blowing your nose, coughing, sneezing, going to the bathroom, or before eating or preparing food
    • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth, and other people with unwashed hands
  • Do not share
    • Do not share dishes, cups/glasses, eating utensils, towels, bedding, or electronics with other people
    • After using personal items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher
  • Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day
    • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in your separate “sick room” and bathroom
    • If possible, wear disposable gloves while cleaning
    • Someone else should clean and disinfect surfaces in common areas
    • If a caregiver or someone else needs to clean and disinfect, it should be done on an as-needed basis
    • Caregivers should wear a face covering and disposable gloves
    • Clean and disinfect areas that might have blood, stool, or bodily fluids on them

When should I seek medical care?

If you think you have been exposed, it is important to closely monitor for symptoms. Seek medical attention immediately if you develop severe symptoms, especially if you experience:

  • Severe trouble breathing (such as being unable to talk without gasping for air)
  • Continuous pain or pressure in your chest
  • Feeling confused or having difficulty waking up
  • Blue-colored lips or face
  • Any other emergency signs or symptoms

If you seek medical attention, be sure to call ahead before visiting the facility. This will help the facility keep other people from possibly getting infected or exposed.

  • Tell any healthcare provider that you may have COVID-19.
  • Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
  • Put on a facemask before you enter any healthcare facility.

What is social distancing?

Social distancing, also called “physical distancing,” means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home. It includes:

  • Staying at least 6 feet (2 meters) from other people
  • Not gathering in groups
  • Staying out of crowded places and avoiding mass gatherings

Social distancing is one of the best ways to avoid being exposed and to help slow the spread of the virus. It is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick. Be sure to continue to follow federal, state, and local government guidance regarding social distancing.

If I have COVID-19, how can I lower my children’s risk of getting sick?

Even if you have COVID-19, it’s possible to not give it to your loved ones if you take certain precautions. For example, you and your child should wear face coverings whenever you’re in the same room together. Depending on your child’s age, you should also:

  • Contact your child’s healthcare provider for advice on how to best protect your child from infection.
  • See if there is a caregiver outside of the home with whom your child can stay if you’re too sick to care for your child. This caregiver should not be anyone who is at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • Avoid physical contact with older children until you’ve ended home isolation.

If your child develops symptoms, contact their healthcare provider for guidance, and follow steps for caring for someone who is sick. See the CDC website for more details on how you can help prevent your child from getting sick.

Can someone who has had COVID-19 become infected again?

Cases of reinfection have been reported but are rare. Reinfection occurs when a person gets sick, recovers, and then later becomes infected again. Whether an individual may be reinfected is still under investigation. A positive PCR test result during the 90 days after illness started is most likely from the initial infection rather than reinfection. Visit the CDC website for further information.

What is “prolonged viral shedding”?

Prolonged viral shedding is what happens when parts of a virus are detectable in a person for a period of time even after they’ve recovered from an illness. For some individuals who had or have COVID-19, the virus may be in their test samples for up to 3 months. Retesting during this time period is not recommended. However, if an individual starts having symptoms consistent with COVID-19 during this period and other illnesses are ruled out, a healthcare provider or infectious disease expert may consider additional testing. The best available evidence suggests that most individuals who have recovered are likely no longer infectious, but there is not enough evidence at this time to confirm this. If you have questions, contact your healthcare provider for additional information.

Can I travel while COVID-19 is spreading?

There are many things to think about when it comes to traveling during this pandemic. Unfortunately, travel increases the risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself and others is to stay home and delay any travel plans you may have. However, if you are planning on taking a trip, there are certain steps you can take to ensure the safety and health of yourself and those around you.

If you decide to take a trip and travel outside your community, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for information on travel considerations. In addition, you’ll want to look at state and local travel restrictions as well as state, territorial, tribal and local public health websites for information before traveling.

Can I travel if I feel sick?

If you’re feeling sick or have been around someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the past 14 days, you should not travel. You may also want to consider whether you or someone you live with is at increased risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. For example, if you or someone you live with has underlying health conditions and/or is older in age, you may want to avoid traveling if you can.

What should I consider while using public transportation?

Airports, buses, trains, and rest stops are all examples of places where people can be exposed to the virus in the air and on surfaces. Since using public transportation can put you in close contact with others, it often becomes hard to practice social distancing. This makes it very important to take steps to protect yourself and others while using public transportation. Some steps you can take include:

  • Wearing a face covering
  • Washing your hands and using hand sanitizer
  • Avoiding unnecessary contact with surfaces and objects
  • Practicing social distancing as much as possible
  • Other general COVID-19 safety precautions

Additionally, it is recommended that you check with the transportation company frequently for any service or operational changes. Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for more resources and guidance on using public transportation.

What should I consider while traveling overnight?

There are several things to consider if you need to travel and book an overnight stay at a hotel:

  • Use contact-free options for online reservation and check-in, mobile room key, and contactless payment if available
  • Before you go, call and ask if all staff are required to wear a cloth face covering
  • Look for extra prevention practices being used by the hotel, such as plexiglass barriers at the check-in counters and physical distancing signs in the lobby
  • Ask if the hotel has updated their cleaning and disinfecting policies
  • Ask for the hotel’s policy on removing and/or cleaning frequently touched items
  • Wear a face covering in the lobby and other common areas
  • Minimize use of areas where close contact with others is likely (e.g., break rooms, outside patios, inside lounging areas, dining areas, game rooms, pools, hot tubs, saunas, spas, salons, and fitness centers)
  • If possible, use the stairs instead of the elevator
  • If you need to take the elevator, wait until you can ride alone or ride only with people from your household

Should I avoid traveling internationally?

COVID-19 risk in most countries is high. You should avoid nonessential travel to high-risk destinations, especially if you or someone you live with is at increased risk for severe illness. You can also check the COVID-19 risk level of specific destinations with this resource.

If you do choose to travel internationally, you may want to consider that some healthcare systems are overwhelmed, and there may be limited access to adequate medical care in affected areas. Many countries are also implementing travel restrictions and mandatory quarantines, closing borders, and prohibiting non-citizens from entry with little advance notice.

Keep in mind that if you choose to travel internationally, your travel plans may be disrupted in several ways. If you get sick or are exposed to a person with COVID-19 during your trip, you may be isolated or quarantined and your return to the United States may be delayed. Check with the Office of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Health, or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information page for more details.

View All Population Specific FAQs

Are the rates for COVID-19 higher in the Black and Hispanic communities? Am I more likely to get COVID-19 if I’m Black and/or Hispanic?

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has shown that there is a higher burden of illness and death from COVID-19 among certain racial and ethnic minority groups. Based on data from New York City, Black and Hispanic people have more cases of COVID-19, as well as higher rates of hospitalization and death due to COVID-19 than White and Asian people. More studies are underway to confirm this data and reduce the impact of COVID-19 on these communities.

Whether or not you get infected with COVID-19 depends on a number of factors. The good news is that you can control many of these factors. Visit the CDC website for more information.

Why are certain racial and ethnic minority groups impacted more by COVID-19?

Recent data suggests that COVID-19 has a greater impact on certain racial and ethnic minority groups. Health differences are often due to social and economic conditions. In public health emergencies, these conditions can isolate people from the resources they need to prepare for and respond to outbreaks. Some conditions contribute to a higher risk of getting sick with COVID-19 for certain racial and ethnic minority groups. These conditions include:

  • Some racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to live in densely populated areas and have multi-generational households, making it difficult to practice prevention and social distancing.
  • Racially segregated and medically underserved neighborhoods are linked to more underlying health conditions. These groups have higher rates of chronic conditions — such as heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease — that increase the severity of COVID-19.
  • Some racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely to have health insurance and have distrust of the medical system, making them less likely to seek care when they are sick.
  • Some racial and ethnic minority groups are critical workers or work jobs where they do not receive paid sick leave, making it more likely they will continue to work even when they are sick.
  • Some racial and ethnic minority groups are overrepresented in jails, prisons, and detention centers, which have specific risks due to close living quarters, shared food services, etc.
  • Some racial and ethnic minority groups don’t speak English or speak English as a second language, sometimes creating a barrier when it comes to access to care.

What is being done to help lower illness and death rates in certain racial and ethnic minority groups?

Researchers as well as state and federal governments are currently monitoring the number of COVID-19 cases, complications, and deaths in minority groups, which will help improve the management of patients, distribution of resources, and public health information.

Additionally, there are many resources available within the community, such as free and low-cost health services, grocery delivery services, and educational materials. Please contact your healthcare provider or local health department for more information.

I am Black and/or Hispanic. What can I do to lower my chances of getting COVID-19?

The best way to protect yourself is to avoid situations in which you may be exposed to the virus. If you or someone you care for is at higher risk of getting sick with COVID-19, take steps to protect them, as well as yourself, from getting sick. These steps include:

  • Stay home and follow isolation practices
  • Wash your hands often
  • Stay away from people you know are sick
  • Wear simple cloth face coverings in public settings

How does COVID-19 affect pregnant women?

COVID-19 can affect pregnant women as well as nonpregnant women. There is not enough evidence at this time to suggest that pregnant women have a higher risk of getting COVID-19. However, studies show that pregnant women may have a higher risk of developing more severe illness. There may also be an increased risk of issues during pregnancy, such as premature birth.

What should I do if I am pregnant and believe I have COVID-19?

If you’re pregnant and think you may have COVID-19, you should contact your healthcare provider to discuss next steps in your care. If you’re in labor and think you have COVID-19, call ahead and notify your hospital or birthing center prior to your arrival so that the healthcare professionals at the facility can take proper precautions to protect you, workers, and other patients.

Should I breastfeed if I have COVID-19?

Recent research suggests that breast milk isn’t likely to spread the virus to babies. However, it’s best to contact your healthcare provider in order to determine if you should continue breastfeeding. You should also take the following precautions during your period of home isolation:

  • Wash your hands using soap and water before touching your child. If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Wear a mask when you are less than six feet from your child (including when feeding them)
  • Clean and sanitize breast pumps

Your child is considered a close contact and should quarantine for the duration of your home isolation and for 14 days afterwards, as recommended by the CDC, unless otherwise specified. In some situations, this time period may be shorter than 14 days. For more information, see the CDC website.

What are hospitals and birthing centers doing for women who develop COVID-19 symptoms while still in their facility?

Hospitals and birthing centers should implement proper disease control practices to help control and prevent the spread of COVID-19. Practices should include testing pregnant women or women who have recently given birth who develop symptoms of COVID-19 while in the hospital. These healthcare facilities should limit the number of visitors to pregnant women or women who have recently given birth who have or are suspected of having COVID-19. Visitors should also be screened for symptoms of COVID-19 prior to entry.

Are people with HIV at higher risk for COVID-19 infection than other people?

Based on limited data at this time, people with HIV who are on effective HIV treatment have the same risk for COVID-19 infection as people who do not have HIV.

Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. This includes people who have weakened immune systems. Individuals with HIV are at greater risk of getting very sick if they have a low CD4 cell count or are not on effective HIV treatment.

What can people with HIV do to protect themselves from COVID-19?

The best way to prevent getting sick is to avoid exposure to the virus. If you have HIV, it’s important to continue taking your HIV medicine and follow the advice of your healthcare provider. You should also eat a healthy diet, get enough sleep, and reduce your stress as much as possible. Staying healthy helps your immune system fight off infection. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, you should also take these everyday preventive actions.

If I have HIV and also have a higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, what can I do to protect myself?

People with HIV have higher rates of certain underlying health conditions. These conditions, as well as older age, can increase the risk for more severe illness if people with HIV get COVID-19. This is especially true for people with advanced HIV.

In addition to following the same recommended safety precautions as everyone else, people with HIV should also take the following steps:

  • Keep a 30- to 90-day supply of your HIV medicine on hand, as well as any other medicines or medical supplies you need for managing HIV. Ask your healthcare provider if you can receive your medicine by mail.
  • Make sure you get all necessary vaccinations, including seasonal flu and bacterial pneumonia, as these conditions affect people with HIV more often.
  • In case you need to isolate, ask your healthcare provider about telemedicine and other remote care options.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about what happens if you do become infected by COVID-19. Make a plan for how you will delay your routine medical and lab visits until follow-up testing and monitoring are possible.

What are the differences between COVID-19 and seasonal allergies?

COVID-19 and seasonal allergies do share some of the same symptoms, which may make it difficult to tell the difference between the two. However, COVID-19 can cause fever and chills, muscle aches, new loss of taste or smell, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, whereas seasonal allergies usually don’t. Seasonal allergies can cause itchy or watery eyes and sneezing, whereas COVID-19 usually doesn’t. If you have any questions about any of your symptoms, be sure to follow up with your healthcare provider. Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for more information.

I have asthma. How can I protect myself against COVID-19?

If you have moderate-to-severe asthma, you may be at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. The virus could cause an asthma attack and possibly lead to pneumonia or acute respiratory disease. But there are steps you can take to protect yourself. These steps include:

  • Keep your asthma under control by following your asthma action plan.
  • Keep taking your medications as prescribed and don’t make any changes without talking to your healthcare provider first.
  • Avoid your asthma triggers.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about creating an emergency supply of prescription medications, such as asthma inhalers. Make sure that you have 30 days of non-prescription medications in case you need to stay home for a long time.

Can the cleaning agents I use to prevent COVID-19 trigger my asthma?

Some disinfectants can trigger an asthma attack. To reduce the chance of an asthma attack while disinfecting to prevent COVID-19, you can try the following tips:

  • Ask an adult without asthma to clean and disinfect for you.
  • Step outside or into a different room during and right after a cleaning.
  • Only use disinfectant when it’s needed. Some surfaces, such as those not touched often, may only need to be cleaned with soap and water and will not need extra disinfecting.
  • If you have an asthma attack, move away from the disinfectant or the area that was disinfected. Follow your asthma action plan. For medical emergencies, call 9-1-1 or go to the emergency room.
  • When cleaning and disinfecting, you or the person who is cleaning should:

View All Quarantine and Isolation FAQs

Should I self-quarantine or self-isolate? How does it work?

If you have been exposed to COVID-19, self-monitoring and self-quarantine is recommended to see if you get sick.

If you have symptoms or have tested positive for COVID-19, self-isolation is recommended so that you do not pass the virus to others.

If you think you may have been exposed or test positive for COVID-19, it is very important to stay home and limit your interaction with others in your household and in public as much as possible.

Stay at least six feet apart from others and avoid having any unnecessary visitors, especially people who are at high risk of severe illness.

If you have previously tested positive for COVID-19, you do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to three months, as long as you do not develop symptoms. Additionally, you do not need to quarantine if you have been vaccinated, it’s been two weeks to three months since your last dose, and you do not have symptoms. However, you should still monitor for symptoms for up to 14 days after your exposure.

If you have questions about whether or not you should quarantine, contact your healthcare provider.

If you believe you have symptoms of COVID-19 or that you have been exposed to the virus, you should consult your place of work for specific guidance about whether to stay home or continue working. You should adhere to  recommendations set forth by your employer or the department of health, as they may differ from the CDC’s guidelines.

Visit the CDC website for more information.

What’s the difference between quarantine and isolation?

Isolation and quarantine are both ways to limit your interaction with others to prevent the spread of disease.

  • Isolation is separating individuals with COVID-19 from people who are not sick. Individuals are separated for a period of time until they are no longer infectious.
  • Quarantine is separating individuals who may have been exposed to COVID-19 from people who are not sick. They are separated for a period of time to see if they develop symptoms.

For more information on self-isolation and self-quarantine, click here.

If someone in my household has to quarantine, should I quarantine as well?

If someone in your household is told to quarantine because they’ve been exposed to COVID-19, you should quarantine as well. This is especially true if you’ve been in close contact with that person. It’s possible for you to have the virus even if you don’t have symptoms. You do not need to quarantine if you have had COVID-19 in the last three months, have recovered, and do not have symptoms. Additionally, you do not need to quarantine if you have been vaccinated, it’s been two weeks to three months since your last dose, and you do not have symptoms. However, you should still monitor for symptoms for up to 14
days after your exposure. If you have questions about whether or not you should quarantine, contact your healthcare provider.

Visit the CDC website for more information.

Is there a difference between stopping isolation vs. stopping quarantine?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommend considering different factors when deciding to stop isolation or quarantine:

  • Those who have been infected with COVID-19 should isolate. They may be able to stop isolating once symptoms have improved, and it has been at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared. Some symptoms such as loss of taste or smell may last for weeks or months and should not delay ending isolation. Those who have never had symptoms may be able to stop isolating 10 days after testing. However, those who had severe illness from
    COVID-19, or people with a weakened immune system, may need to isolate longer than 10 days or may require testing to determine when they can be around others.
  • Those who have been possibly exposed to COVID-19 should quarantine. They may be able to stop quarantining if they don’t develop symptoms, and it has been at least 14 days after possible exposure. Although 14 days is recommended, the CDC suggests that some individuals may be able to quarantine for a shorter period of time. Individuals without symptoms can end quarantine at day 10 without testing, or at day 7 if they receive a negative test result on day 5 or later. The length of time to quarantine may be decided by your state or local department of health. You should adhere to recommendations set forth by the department of health, as they may differ from the CDC’s guidelines. Those who’ve been possibly exposed to COVID-19 but have already had COVID-19 in the last three months, recovered, and do not have symptoms, do not need to quarantine.

Please note that it’s possible for a person diagnosed with COVID-19 to stop isolation before someone possibly exposed can stop quarantining.

For more information on self-isolation and self-quarantine, click here.

I had a COVID-19 PCR test within 14 days of being exposed to the virus, and my test result came back negative. Do I still need to quarantine?

You should continue to quarantine for 14 days after your last exposure, even if you test negative during that time. Although 14 days is recommended, the CDC suggests individuals without symptoms can end quarantine at day 7 if they receive a negative test result on day 5 or later. The length of time to quarantine may be decided by your state or local department of health. You should adhere to recommendations set forth by the department of health, as they may differ from the CDC’s guidelines.

It is important to note that it can take up to 14 days to develop symptoms. A negative result before the end of a 14-day quarantine period does not rule out a possible infection. You should continue to monitor for symptoms and practice COVID-19 safety precautions. Contact your healthcare provider right away and isolate immediately if you develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19.

Who should quarantine?

Anyone who may have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 should quarantine. Close contact includes:

  • Being within six feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period
  • Providing care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
  • Direct physical contact with someone who has COVID-19 (hugged or kissed them)
  • Sharing eating or drinking utensils with someone who has COVID-19
  • Being exposed to respiratory droplets from someone who has COVID-19 (being sneezed or coughed on)

People who have tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to three months, as long as they do not develop symptoms.

I’m traveling soon. Do I need to quarantine?

Depending on where you’re going, you may need to quarantine at your destination if there are entry requirements and restrictions. Be sure to check state, territorial, tribal and local public health websites for more information on travel quarantines. International travelers should check with the Office of Foreign Affairs or Ministry of Health or the US Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Country Information page for more details.

When should I start and end quarantine?

If you’ve been exposed to COVID-19, you should quarantine for 14 days. This period begins from the last close contact you had with someone who has COVID-19, even if you test negative for COVID-19 or feel healthy. Although 14 days is recommended, the CDC suggests that some individuals may be able to quarantine for a shorter period of time. Individuals without symptoms can end quarantine at day 10 without testing, or at day 7 if they receive a negative test result on day 5 or later. The length of time to quarantine may be decided by your state or local department of health. You should adhere to recommendations set forth by the department of health, as they may differ from the CDC’s guidelines.

If you live in a household where you cannot avoid close contact with the person who has COVID-19, you should quarantine immediately. You will need to continue to quarantine for 14 days after the person meets criteria to end home isolation, as recommended by the CDC, unless otherwise specified. In some situations, this time period may be shorter than 14 days. For additional questions about when to start or stop quarantine, be sure to contact your healthcare provider.

For additional questions about when to start or stop quarantine, be sure to contact your healthcare provider

When can I stop in-home isolation?

If you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19, please check with your primary healthcare provider or local health department to help determine when it’s right to stop isolation. Typically this is done when fever and symptoms improve and 10 days have passed since symptoms started. Some symptoms, such as loss of taste or smell, may last for weeks or months and should not delay ending isolation. If you do not have symptoms, you may be able to stop isolating 10 days after your test was performed. Be sure to continue to follow federal, state, and local government guidance regarding social distancing and isolation. For more information, please visit the CDC website.

View All PCR Test FAQs

Should I stay home while waiting for my PCR test results?

Whether or not you stay home depends on the reason you’re getting tested.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 or have been exposed to it, you should stay home and avoid others to prevent potentially spreading it. Let other members of your household and your immediate contacts know that they should quarantine or get tested. Continue to watch for signs and symptoms of COVID-19, and follow the recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on what to do if you’re sick.

Specifically, you can follow these steps while waiting for your test results:

  • Stay home and monitor your health
  • Review locations and people you’ve been in contact with in the past two weeks
  • Answer the phone call from the health department

If you get tested regularly for work, school, or any other reason, be sure to follow protocols and recommendations set forth by your employer, school, or health department, as these may differ from the CDC’s guidelines.

What is a false negative COVID-19 PCR test result?

The test can show a negative result even if you are infected with COVID-19*. This can happen if:

  • It is too soon for the test to detect the virus.
  • There was a problem with your sample or the test itself. No test is 100% accurate at all times.
  • If your results are negative and you’re having symptoms, continue to follow isolation precautions and ask your healthcare provider if you need further testing.
  • If your results are negative and you don’t have any symptoms, continue to monitor for any symptoms up to 14 days after your last possible exposure.

*Although the possibility is low, a false negative result should be considered if you have had recent exposure to the virus along with symptoms consistent with COVID-19.

What is a false positive COVID-19 PCR test result?

This test can show a positive result even if you are not infected with COVID-19. This can happen if there was a problem with your sample or the test itself. These tests have been designed to minimize false positive results. If you are concerned about the accuracy of your results, ask your healthcare provider if you need further testing.

What does an indeterminate COVID-19 PCR test result mean?

Indeterminate means that the test did not detect a clear positive or negative result. It was unable toaccurately detect COVID-19.

Your result could be indeterminate if:

  • You are infected with COVID-19 but the test was done too early to detect the virus, OR
  • There was a problem with the sample you provided or the test itself.

It is recommended that you get retested or see a healthcare provider to discuss your result and confirm next steps. To get retested, please directly contact the company from which you ordered the test or ask your healthcare provider about testing recommendations.

What happens if I have a positive PCR test result for COVID-19?

You should immediately isolate and wear a face mask at all times. You may be contacted by public health authorities for contact tracing purposes. This means that officials will ask you to provide information about your immediate household contacts and anyone else you may have been in contact with in case those people should be tested for COVID-19 and self-isolate as well.

If I have a positive PCR test result, can I pass the virus to others?

Available data indicates that individuals with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 remain infectious no longer than 10 days after symptoms start. How long someone remains infectious varies by individual and depends on the severity of illness. To prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect people in your home and community, follow these guidelines provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Should I get retested if I’ve already tested positive for COVID-19?

Retesting for COVID-19 is not recommended for individuals who have tested positive in the past 3 months. Available data indicates that individuals with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 are no longer infectious 10 days after symptoms start. Individuals with severe or critical illness, as well as those who have a weakened immune system, may remain infectious for up to 20 days after symptoms start. Individuals who have recovered may have detectable virus in their samples for up to 3 months after the start of infection, but may not be infectious during that time. If you have questions, contact your healthcare provider for additional information.

What should I do if I start to have symptoms after previously testing positive for COVID-19?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that individuals who develop new symptoms consistent with COVID-19 during the 3 months after a known infection may need to be retested if another condition cannot be ruled out. Follow up with your healthcare provider or an infectious disease expert for additional information. You may need to self-isolate during this time, especially if you develop symptoms within 14 days after close contact with an infected person.

It’s been several weeks since my previous COVID-19 test, and I no longer have symptoms. Why am I still testing positive for COVID-19?

People who have recovered from COVID-19 may have detectable amounts of the virus in their nasal swab or saliva samples for up to three months after the start of infection, even though they may not be able to spread the virus during that time. Research indicates that people who had mild-to-moderate COVID-19 are no longer infectious 10 days after symptoms start. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all people, whether or not they’ve had COVID-19, continue to take safety measures to avoid becoming infected or spreading COVID-19. If you have questions, please contact your healthcare provider for additional information.

It’s been several months since I tested positive for COVID-19, and I’m still experiencing symptoms. Should I be concerned?

If you still have symptoms of COVID-19, be sure to follow up with your healthcare provider. Together, you can figure out the next steps and create a plan that’s right for you.

View All General Test FAQs

How do I know if the COVID-19 PCR test is accurate and reliable?

PWNHealth only uses COVID-19 tests that have received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). These authorized tests minimize the chance of inaccurate, false positive, or false negative results. The FDA has found that tests that meet certain standards are of superior quality and have high sensitivity and specificity* (measurements of accuracy).

PWNHealth will not use tests that have been shown to have low sensitivity and specificity. For additional information, please reach out to the lab directly.

*Actual sensitivity and specificity may vary between test manufacturers. A sample that is not properly collected may also result in an inaccurate result.

What is the difference between an antibody test and a PCR test?

An antibody test checks to see if you’ve developed antibodies against COVID-19, which occurs after being exposed to the virus. Antibody tests do not show whether a person is currently infected.

PCR tests check for genetic material (viral RNA) produced by the virus. It determines if you’re currently infected and can spread COVID-19 to others.

When would I get an antibody test vs. a PCR test?

You should get an antibody test if you’ve been previously exposed or believe you’ve been exposed to COVID-19 and want to see if you have developed antibodies.

You should get a PCR test if you think you have an active COVID-19 infection.

Visit the CDC website for more information.

If I’m having symptoms of COVID-19 or believe I’ve been exposed to it, what type of test should I get?

If you’re currently having symptoms of COVID-19 or have recently been exposed, you should get a molecular PCR test to see if you’re currently infected.

Can an antibody test be used instead of a PCR test to diagnose COVID-19?

Antibody tests do not show whether a person is currently infected. Therefore, they should not be used in place of a PCR test to diagnose a current infection.

Can an antibody test be used together with a PCR test?

Antibody tests can complement PCR tests by providing information about exposure and how the immune system responds to COVID-19 infections.

Can a COVID-19 test tell me when I can visit someone who is at risk for severe symptoms of the virus?

There is no test that can tell you when you can visit someone who is at risk for more severe symptoms of COVID-19. Check with your primary healthcare provider or local health department to help determine when the time is right to make such visits. Be sure to continue to follow federal, state, and local government guidance regarding social distancing and COVID-19 safety precautions.

What is the difference between Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the authority to grant Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to diagnostic tests that have not yet received formal approval in times of a public health emergency. The FDA has granted EUA for certain tests during the COVID-19 pandemic to help detect or diagnose COVID-19.

Like full FDA approval, EUA relies on strict standards. However, EUA is completed more quickly based on the limited data that is available, unlike full FDA approval.

For more information, please visit the FDA website.

Have COVID-19 tests been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?

The antibody tests and the molecular tests (together referred to as “tests”) have not been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA);

The FDA has authorized the use of some tests by certain laboratories under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA);

The antibody tests have been authorized for the detection of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 only, and not for the detection of any other viruses or pathogens;

The molecular (PCR) tests have been authorized for the detection of nucleic acid from SARS-CoV-2 only, and not for the detection of any other viruses or pathogens; and,

Tests are only authorized for as long as the circumstances exist to justify the authorization of emergency use of in vitro diagnostics for detection and/or diagnosis of COVID-19 under Section 564(b)(1) of the Act, 21 U.S.C. § 360bbb-3(b)(1), unless the authorization is terminated or revoked sooner.

What does “sensitivity” mean? What does “specificity” mean?

Sensitivity and specificity are different and complementary measures to inform doctors and patients about the accuracy of a test. A good test has both high sensitivity and high specificity.

  • Sensitivity is a measure of how well a test is able to detect people who are infected (positive cases). If a person has an infection, a test with 100% sensitivity can accurately detect it with a positive result.
  • Specificity is a measure of how well a test can detect people who are NOT infected (negative cases). If a person does not have an infection, a test with 100% specificity can accurately detect it with a negative result.

What are false positives and false negatives?

A positive result that is incorrect is called a false positive. False positives occur when a person tests positive even though they do not have the infection.

A negative result that is incorrect is called a false negative. False negatives occur when a person tests negative even though they do have the infection.

False negatives and positives can worsen the COVID-19 pandemic by providing false reassurance to those who have the infection or by causing those who do not have it to use critical resources.

Will anyone else contact me about my results? Why am I getting a call from the health department?

Patients should expect a call from PWNHealth if they test positive. PWNHealth is required by law to report any positive COVID-19 PCR results to state or local health departments. You may be contacted to discuss who you’ve been in close contact with to help stop the spread of the virus. Please be sure to answer the phone or call them back if they try to reach you. It may be helpful to start thinking about the people you have spent time with, beginning 2 days before your symptoms started (or if no symptoms, 2 days before you had your test taken). If you have additional questions, please contact your local health department or visit the CDC
website.

View All Pediatric FAQs

Can my child get tested?

Testing is available for children 4 years of age and older.

If your child has new or worsening emergency warning signs, such as severe trouble breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, or blue-colored lips or face, call 911 or seek emergency medical attention instead of ordering this test.

Should my child get a COVID-19 PCR test?

Your child should get tested if:

  • They have symptoms of COVID-19
  • They live in or visit a place where people reside, meet, or gather in close proximity. This can include homeless shelters, group homes, detention centers, playgroups, schools, chuch, camp, daycare, etc.
  • They have been in close contact with someone with confirmed COVID-19 within the past 14 days

This test may also be helpful if:

  • Your child may have been exposed and has an underlying condition that may increase the risk for severe disease

If you have any other questions, we recommend that you speak with your child’s primary healthcare provider about testing recommendations to see if testing is right for your child at this time.

How do I prepare my child for testing?

  • It is important to set realistic expectations. Do not pretend the testing experience will be painless. Reassure your child that the testing process will be quick, the pain won’t last, and that you’ll be with them the entire time. After the test, praise and comfort your child as needed.
  • Make sure your child is tested when they are less likely to be tired or hungry. Your child does not need to fast or stop taking any medications before testing. Eating and drinking plenty of water before the test will help lower the risk of lightheadedness and can help
    make the process smoother.
  • Talk about feelings or practice calming techniques before the test. You can do this by making a game of staying still or practicing breathing exercises with your child. It may also be helpful to distract your child during the procedure.
  • Before testing, discuss any concerns and questions with your child’s primary healthcare provider. Further instructions will be provided to you at the lab or in your test kit.

What is the risk of my child getting sick from COVID-19?

Based on all available evidence, children do not have a higher risk of getting COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants get sick with the virus, adults make up most of the known cases. Most cases in children occur due to exposure from someone in their household. Children with certain underlying conditions might have a higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19. Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for more information.

How do I protect my child from COVID-19?

You can protect your child from COVID-19 by encouraging them to take the same safety precautions as everyone else:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick, unless you are seeking medical care.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces (including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks).
  • Launder items, including washable plush toys, using the warmest water setting allowed for the items. Dry them completely. Dirty laundry from an ill person can be washed with other people’s items.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water aren’t available. Always wash hands with soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Be sure to also track and follow community safety measures, such as school closures. Discourage
children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is closed to help slow the
spread of COVID-19 in the community.

Are COVID-19 symptoms different for children?

The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with the virus generally have mild symptoms and recover within one to two weeks. Symptoms in children include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Tiredness
  • Headache and muscle aches
  • Refusing to eat or drink
  • New loss of taste or smell

There is more to be learned about how the disease impacts children. For example, it’s not yet known whether some children may be at higher risk for severe illness, such as children with underlying medical conditions and special healthcare needs.

What should I do if my child has symptoms of COVID-19?

If your child develops symptoms of COVID-19, it is important to closely monitor them. Most people,  including children, develop mild symptoms that resolve within two weeks. If your child develops symptoms of COVID-19, talk to your child’s healthcare provider about steps you should take to help your child recover at home. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends both children and adults follow the same steps if they have the virus. See those steps here. Notify your child’s healthcare provider if someone else in your house becomes sick with COVID-19, so they can provide any advice specific for your child.

If your child has new or worsening emergency warning signs, such as severe trouble breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, feeling confused or having difficulty waking up, or blue-colored lips or face, call 911. When you call, tell the operator you suspect your child has COVID-19 so that first responders can protect themselves and others.

Should my child get tested for COVID-19 antibodies even if they never had symptoms?

Children can be tested for antibodies, since they may make up a large portion of the population that are asymptomatic (no symptoms) or have only mild symptoms when infected with COVID-19.

Antibody tests can play a critical role in the fight against COVID-19. They help healthcare providers identify individuals who have antibodies to the virus and have developed an immune response. In the future, these tests, along with other data, may potentially help determine whether individuals with antibodies have immunity or are less likely to get reinfected. At this time, however, it is unknown how long antibodies last and whether having antibodies means that an individual is immune

What is multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), and how is it related to COVID-19?

New evidence suggests that children who have or have had COVID-19 may develop an inflammatory condition similar to Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome up to 4 weeks after their infection. This condition is called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). If you suspect that your child has symptoms of this inflammatory syndrome (fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, eye redness, or feeling overly tired), be sure to see your child’s healthcare provider right away. The good news is that this condition is treatable when caught early.

Should my child get tested if they have symptoms of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that in individuals who have not been tested for COVID-19 and have symptoms of a condition that occurs after COVID-19 infection (like MIS-C), PCR and antibody testing may be used for further evaluation. Follow up with your child’s healthcare provider for further information about testing related to MIS-C.

Should children wear face masks?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that every person aged 2 years and older wear a cloth covering or mask that covers their nose and mouth when they are out in public places. Cloth face coverings should NOT be put on babies or children younger than 2 because of the danger of suffocation. Wearing cloth face coverings is one safety measure that can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 when used in addition to other measures such as social distancing and frequent hand washing.

How do I talk to my child about COVID-19?

Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your child about the outbreak and reassure them that they are safe. When you speak, try to remain calm. Explain to your child that most illnesses from COVID-19 seem to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults. If you need support, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers resources to help talk with children about COVID-19.

Should my child be around other children?

It is important that your child limits time with other children. If children meet in groups, it can put everyone at risk. Children can pass this virus to others who have an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If children are playing outside their own homes, it is essential that they remain 6 feet from anyone who is not in their own household. For more information, visit the CDC website.

Should my child be around other people?

It is important that your child limits time with people who may be at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If others in your home have an increased risk, consider extra safety precautions to help separate your child from those people. Consider postponing visits or trips to see older family members and grandparents.

If I have COVID-19, how can I lower my children’s risk of getting sick?

Even if you have COVID-19, it’s possible to not give it to your loved ones if you take certain precautions. For example, you and your child should wear face coverings whenever you’re in the same room together. Depending on your child’s age, you should also:

  • Contact your child’s healthcare provider for advice on how to best protect your child from
    infection.
  • See if there is a caregiver outside of the home with whom your child can stay if you’re too sick to care for your child. This caregiver should not be anyone who is at high risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.
  • Avoid physical contact with older children until you’ve ended home isolation.

If your child develops symptoms, contact their healthcare provider for guidance, and follow steps for caring for someone who is sick. See the CDC website for more details on how you can help prevent your child from getting sick.